Confucius on Good Government, the 6 Steps to a Harmonious Society, and Self-Discipline as the Key to Democracy – Brain Pickings

by Jeremy

Two and a half millennia before Leonard Cohen wrote in his timeless and tender ode to democracy that “the heart has got to open fundamentally,” the ancient Chinese philosopher and statesman Confucius (551–479 BCE) recognized the indelible link between personal and political morality, realized that interpersonal kindness is the foundation of social justice, recognized that democracy — a form of government only just invented on the other side of the globe in ancient Greece, not to take root in his own culture for epochs — begins in the heart.

Confucius. 1909 engraving, artist unknown. (Available as a print.)

Centuries before the advent of Christianity and its central tenet of the golden rule, the Chinese sage pioneered the concept of compassion as a moral guiding principle — an ancient idea subtly yet profoundly different from empathy, which only entered the modern lexicon at the dawn of the twentieth century as a term for projecting oneself into a work of art. On his existential reading list of essential books for every stage of life, Tolstoy listed Confucius among the most mature reading.

His teachings influenced millennia of poets, political leaders, and ordinary people seeking to live nobler, kinder, more empowered lives. Among them was the poet Ezra Pound (October 30, 1885–November 1, 1972) — a man of immense talent and immense blind spots, of sympathetic idealisms and troubling sympathies — who set out to translate and compile

The most enduring teachings of the great Chinese sage. His 1927 more-than-translation earned Pound the $2,000 poetry prize of The Dial — the pioneering Transcendentalist magazine Margaret Fuller and Ralph Waldo Emerson had launched nearly a century earlier at the peak of their intense and complicated relationship shaped the history of modern thought. Pound used the funds to launch his poetic-political magazine. His translation was published in book form as Confucius: The Unwobbling Pivot / The Great Digest / The Analects (public library).

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